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On board with Rockwell Collins in Latin America

Latin America has a diverse, fascinating aviation market with unique challenges and opportunities.  Rockwell Collins has had a long presence in the region, providing avionics systems to airlines and aircraft manufacturers but the company is less well known as an airport systems provider. However, this is changing—and for good reason.

Augusto de Macedo Santos, regional head of Airport Systems for Rockwell Collins, is passionate about offering the best service and solutions to airports in Latin America. By listening to clients and building trust, the Airport Systems team has made real headway.

“We are focused and dedicated to implementing cutting-edge solutions at airports and winning new customers throughout the region,” Santos commented. 

Demonstrating Success: Helping Regional Airports  

Until just a few years ago, Rockwell Collins was relatively unknown in Latin America, but some high profile opportunities changed all that. First, the need to improve airport security systems for the 2014 World Cup gave Rockwell Collins the opportunity to show the region what it could do.

From a security perspective, it was extremely important to keep track of passengers as they traveled through different parts of the airport terminal. Rockwell Collins tailored its systems to suit this particular project and, by automating the airport’s screening process, was able to improve passenger flow by 15-20 percent. Needless to say, the client was impressed.

Time was a critical imperative

Two years later, Brazil was preparing once again to host a major sporting event. This time, the 2016 Summer Games were coming to Rio de Janeiro and an experienced, trustworthy supplier was needed to upgrade the airport systems and operations at Antonio Carlos Jobim International Airport (GIG)

Rockwell Collins was chosen for the prestigious project and Augusto explains the importance of this commission. “The Rio Games was our first large systems integration assignment in the Americas and it was a very large and complex airport operations project. Completing the project on time was a critical imperative and was a key focus for our team.”  

Better, safer airport experience

Rockwell Collins installed a range of hardware and software solutions that  supported the increased passenger flow during the Games, and also offered passengers a better, safer airport experience. The airport systems implementation included the company’s ARINC vMUSETM common use passenger processing system, ARINC SelfServTM check in kiosk, ARINC AirPlan resource management system, ARINC Enterprise messaging, ARINC AirVueTM flight information display system and much more.

The success of the project demonstrated Rockwell Collins’ ability to meet the toughest challenges of Latin America’s aviation industry.

From strength to strength by tailoring systems

Since the 2016 Rio Games, Rockwell Collins has become a highly regarded provider across the Latin American region. Augusto has noticed a real shift. Before, the company was an outsider but now, Rockwell Collins is a strong local player. “We are now working on opportunities in multiple countries throughout the region.  I don’t think we’d have been considered for these projects without our successful deployments for the World Cup and Rio Games.” 

He believes Rockwell Collins’ growing presence and success is due to a simple ethos of always listening to the customer. By understanding their unique needs, Rockwell Collins tailors systems to the specific requirements of the airport, country and region. 

Growing Trust

This personal approach, alongside a commitment to hiring local people, has resulted in successful projects for airports big and small, and has won Rockwell Collins respect.

Evidence of growing trust in the company was recently shown in Mexico, where Rockwell Collins was awarded a major contract to provide passenger processing and validation systems for 13 airports.  This is just one of many new projects and contract extensions happening throughout the region. 

Looking Ahead

Rockwell Collins is definitely no longer unknown in Latin America, but the team is always looking to break new ground. 

With their presence firmly established, Augusto says the goal is to offer better and more innovative solutions. “Hard work from the whole team has paid dividends and I hope to continue that.”

The team’s client-focussed ethos drives outstanding results and the Latin American aviation industry is taking note. Rockwell Collins continues to grow in terms of revenue and people, expanding at a much faster rate than its competitors. This, however, is not the cause of their success, but the consequence of listening to clients and doing an outstanding job. Airports in Latin America are truly getting on board with Rockwell Collins. 

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Next Generation Self-Service Innovations to Improve Passenger Experience Using Biometrics and Identity Management

As air travel continues to increase on a global scale, airports from all over the world are seeking innovation in self-service passenger processing solutions to improve passenger experience and streamline airport operations through identity management and biometrics.

Although it is widely recognised that complete automation, and a paperless passenger processing experience from airport arrival to take-off is still some years away, Rockwell Collins is involved in testing and research of biometrics innovation to consolidate its already successful self-service airport solutions with that goal firmly in mind.

Tony Chapman, director of strategic programs for Rockwell Collins Global Airports talks to us about Biometrics and Identity Management in the next generation of Rockwell Collins' Self-Service innovations.

Facial recognition and biometrics data challenges in the airport environment

The latest innovation in passports typically includes Common Use Identity Management specific to travellers, such as measured distances between facial features, for example. This data can be captured and verified by cameras located at strategic points within the airport, and linked to airport computer systems that hold travel documentation.

Challenges arise around the world in this process of identity management, largely due to a lack of standardization for required information. Tony Chapman, notes that ‘Everyone is looking for something more unique than facial features and adds that while the system is good, ‘you have to look up at the camera’.

There are also concerns and challenges surrounding privacy laws regarding biometrics data-sharing, which differ from country to country. 

The CLEAR approach to identity management

CLEAR, currently operational in 14 airports in the U.S. allows passengers to use dedicated security lanes to expedite passenger processing using a biometric boarding pass. Subject to advance, pre-approval, CLEAR is privately-run and works to a similar process as that operated by the TSA.

Recent testing with Alaska Airlines, using fingerprint comparison with boarding records, proved successful, and can be used in the future to replace the paper boarding pass, or the electronic boarding passes typically stored on mobile phones.

How Rockwell Collins see the future of biometrics to improve passenger experience

Rockwell Collins’ vision for the future of passenger processing takes a holistic view of the planned airport experience, from the moment of arrival after following a booking process. From this point, passenger experience will take on a completely new focus, with a self-service progression throughout the airport to the point of boarding. 

The passenger is met with a facial recognition camera at a self-service bag drop kiosk, where the passport is scanned. A comparison is made of the traveller’s features with the biometrics data stored in the document and the passenger travel documentation, such as ticket and boarding pass stored within the airline DCS. This data is automatically passed to the relevant government department or agency for security screening.

Once baggage is handled using the self-service features of the kiosk, including electronic tagging and security scanning, the passenger heads to security, where he is met with another facial recognition camera to verify the biometrics data. This process of facial recognition continues at the gate, and upon arrival at the destination airport. 

According to Chapman, this final part of the process will prove to be the most challenging, requiring the biometrics agreements and standards to be in place across the world. 

Rockwell Collins has been approaching research and development of its vision for more than 18 months, with the core idea being in place for almost a decade, following issues in the U.K. with travellers from some countries in Africa arriving as economic immigrants at the border, having destroyed travel documentation after leaving their native country. Although the trials involved manual processing, Chapman says it ‘started our thinking on how to automate this whole process’.

Other visions for automation in the marketplace include the use of mobile phones and devices containing pre-programmed biometrics data, yet this vision is open to abuse if not carefully policed within the airport environment.

There is little doubt that at some point in the future, innovation will deliver complete automation to encompass every step of the passenger experience within a framework of self-service systems using biometrics identity management. Rockwell Collins continues to improve passenger experience with self-service airport systems, such as Common Use Identity Management, airport self-service check-in and bag drop kiosks and baggage systems, used in airports around the world.

 

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Regional Check- In: Augusto de Macedo Santos provides a regional update of aviation in Latin America and Caribbean

What’s the most important event happening in your region right now?

Augusto - The 2016 Summer Games in Rio is pretty big! Rockwell Collins has been selected by the Rio Galeão consortium to supply the core airport operations systems for the modernisation of the airport in preparation for the Games in Rio de Janeiro. We're proud of this selection and to be partnering with Rio Galeão on this project because the airport is an  important gateway into Latin America. As an industry leading supplier of mission critical airport systems, we are providing an essential part of the seamless travel experience to the 2016 Summer Games for athletes and spectators, so all-in-all we are rather excited to be such a major part of this initiative.

So Augusto, what are we providing at Rio Galeão?

Augusto - We are providing a number of key operational solutions that will enable the airport to better handle the influx of passengers and aircraft arriving for the 2016 games.

First we are implementing the airport operation database, ARINC AirDB. ,We're also implementing ARINC AirPlan resource management system to optimise the parking positions, baggage carousels, and a number of other airport resources. We’ve implemented ARINC VeriPax, a passenger validation system through automated gates that helps streamline the security process by dramatically decreasing the time needed to screen passengers at security checkpoints. We're providing ARINC AirVue, the flight information display systems, which inform passengers of their flight status on big screens throughout the airport. Finally, we are implementing the fully automated, multi-lingual public announcement system.

One key part of this entire implementation that passengers don’t really see but that impacts the quality of their experience at the airport is the integration between multiple systems. So we are integrating over a dozen different systems to provide more accurate information to the passengers, and airlines and to the aviation community as a whole. Having this information helps everybody at the airport do a better job.

Just how important is that?

Augusto - Well, it is very important because the products I’m talking about  are the ones that operate the key systems at the airport. They  defines where each aircraft parks, it determines if there is enough  capacity to absorb new flights or not, and  informs passengers about where their flight is coming from or if their flight is delayed, cancelled, etc., It's really the core of the day-to-day operations of running of the airport. Without the systems integration services we provided, it would be very challenging for Rio Galeão to handle an event as large as the Summer Games.

Of all the systems Rockwell Collins is implementing for Rio Galeão, which will make the most impact in the run up to and also during the Summer Games?

Augusto - I think ARINC VeriPax will have the most impact.,With VeriPax, both domestic and international passengers will automatically scan their boarding passes and go through automated gates before boarding. First and foremost, this increases security, but it also improves the passenger experience as it simplifies the flow of passengers going through security and reaching the gate area. We expect to have a flow of 50 passengers per minute, which is much, much higher than the airport had previously. The bottom line is that it improves the overall satisfaction of the passenger with the service the airport provides. 

That sounds invaluable for the expected influx of passengers for the Summer Games. What was it that actually made the customers select this particular solution?

Augusto - We participated in an international competition with several other companies for supplying these products to Rio Galeo. Ultimately, we had a superior technical solution, and we were also very open to cooperating with the airport in jointly finding solutions to the challenges that the airport and the wider airport community had. I think the decision came down to a combination of technical excellence and our commercial approach in working together with the airport as a partner to achieve the best solution for passengers, airlines, ground handlers and airport operators alike.

It sounds as though a great strength of Rockwell Collins’ is a collaborative approach—becoming a trusted advisor to the customer. Would you say that was fair?

Augusto - Yes, definitely. Naturally the customer had an understanding of what they wanted to accomplish. What Rockwell Collins was able to do was achieve their objectives with technology and by working together, understanding their specific needs for the airport, and leveraging our in-depth knowledge of the airport environment to provide the very best solution possible.

For example, although we have implemented the ARINC VeriPax passenger validation solution in multiple sites around the world, we developed a tailored solution specifically for Rio Galeão because they had some specific needs. We worked with a new hardware supplier, and developed the specific elements needed for this airport. The same thing applies to the ARINC AirVue flight information systems and ARINC AirPlan the resource management systems.The Rockwell Collins approach is not just world class technology but also the willingness and openness to understand the customers' needs and adapt to offer the very best solution for each project.

There seems to be quite a number of people now converting, or choosing to move from other suppliers to Rockwell Collins.  Why do you think that is?

Augusto - After Rockwell Collins acquired ARINC there was a big shift in terms of our investment and how we are enhancing our products to solve airport’s problems. There was also a shift in how we approach the market and I think that is why we are seeing a number of airports moving from their current vendor to Rockwell Collins. It's a lot of good technology—both developed in-house and through partnering with preferred suppliers in the market for specific elements of a solution— integrated by Rockwell Collins.

More than this though, our collaborative approach means we are much more open to work with our customers in understanding their specific needs and providing tailored solutions to their problems, because at the end of the day that's what we do: we solve problems. And the reflection of our success is a growing number of customers are migrating from existing providers to Rockwell Collins.

So how would you see things changing in the picture for airports in five years' time, in your region?

Augusto - In Latin America, you have a mix of a few very large airports and a number of much smaller airports. In that scenario,  you have a spectrum regarding the of maturity of technology and the  process within the airports. My expectations for the larger airports is that we will continue to provide self-service check-in, self-service bag drop, self-service boarding, and self-service everything, including introducing efficiency improvements through the integration of  biometric solutions, especially for integration and optimised passenger processing during departure and arrival at customs and immigration. 

With respect to smaller airports, I see more and more automation. Often those airports face challenges in having local IT staff, so I see a lot of automation going on, especially in terms  of the airport operations and passengers information systems. 

It's very exciting. Latin America is definitely a growth region. There’s a lot of opportunity as well as a lot of privatisation. Recently, there’s been a shift in airport ownership structure. It is very exciting and we're thrilled to be part of the growth engine for this market. We understand Latin America is a key market for Rockwell Collins' growth in the future.

If you had one last thing that you'd like to say to all the airports in your region, what would it be?

Augusto - Trust us. Trust is an important word at Rockwell Collins. In fact, our motto is, “building trust every day.”  Rockwell Collins is still somewhat unknown to many airports in the region and they might be used to other company names but we provide world leading technology and we have listen to our customers, we tailor our solutions to the specific needs of our customers. So if I had to say one thing, I would say trust us - trust us to listen to your problems and to provide our insight. We have a lot of experience in different markets of the world and we're growing because of the trust our customers have placed in us.

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The Aviation Information Age

"Utilising people-friendly tech boosts passenger satisfaction as well as profit margins."

In 2015, the world saw a huge increase in those taking to the air. The IATA reported the largest increase in demand for air travel in five years, with global passenger traffic rising by 6.5%. Focussing for a moment on the specific Asia-Pacific region, demand for air travel rose by an incredible 8.2%. With this in mind, IATA forecasts that by 2034, 2.8 billion passengers could be travelling every year in this region alone.

For those in the aviation industry, this is fantastic news. However, modern customers have an almost insatiable taste for technology. In order to keep passengers satisfied and loyal, while at the same time looking after your bottom line, it is essential to keep up with the latest advancements in relevant technology.   

Connected, contented passengers

People are increasingly reliant on technology. At home and work, they are never far from their smartphones, laptops and tablets; constantly online and continually connected. Passengers do not want to give this up when they cross the threshold of an airport or even board a plane. In fact, a recent study showed that passengers are more likely to pay for services that keep them in the loop than ever before.   

The current understanding of inflight entertainment must be exchanged for a new way of thinking about the passenger experience. Next generation connectivity allows passengers to use their devices, browse the internet, send and receive emails, text, and use social media while in the air. A step on from ‘entertainment’, we are presented with the opportunity for passenger ‘engagement’.

This ability to offer connectivity creates the opportunity for revenue. Passengers are willing to spend money in order to stay connected. It also allows airlines to target content at their frequent-flyer customers. 

Sichuan Airlines has already implemented a seat-centric inflight entertainment system, allowing them to tailor a unique look and experience for their passengers.   

Jazeera Airways has also invested in a new inflight entertainment and connectivity system in order to increase customer satisfaction and loyalty. It is essential that airlines keep up with customer appetite for connectivity in order to remain competitive. 

Automated, efficient, satisfying

Before passengers even board the plane, they want to make use of the available technology. IATA data reveals that around 75% of worldwide passengers would prefer more self-service options to make their journey quicker. 

The aviation industry has already taken steps to automate systems and speed up processes. There is a greater emphasis on easy, smooth progression from arrival at the airport to check in and on to boarding.   

Self-service systems are becoming ever more popular and widely used in Asia. Facilities such as self-service check-in kiosks, bag tagging and bag-drop counters, and even security clearance and boarding are all making the airport experience much more convenient and passenger-friendly.  

Airports that embrace self-service allow passengers the freedom to control their own journeys through the system.

A great example of this concept going a step further is found in Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport (IGIA). They have given staff portable check-in devices, allowing them to offer a mobile check-in service anywhere in the airport. 

The move to offering more self-service facilities is proving a popular concept and is being implemented on a huge scale. A fantastic example is IATA’s Fast Travel Program which is encouraging the industry-wide use of such facilities in six stages of the airport journey: check-in, bag drop, document check, flight re-booking, self-boarding and bag recovery.   

In order to offer these facilities, airports have shown interest in fully integrated, end-to-end solutions. This is resulting in increased use of biometric technology and the demand for better tracking solutions. This can currently be delivered through iris, fingerprint and facial recognition, allowing passengers to smoothly and confidently move through the airport system at a much faster pace than before.  

Some American airports have been quick to adopt these biometric solutions and many will follow. There is increasing demand for these services and more and more airports will soon roll out integrated, self-service systems.   

Enhancing the experience, boosting the bottom line

As passengers travel through the airport and onto their flights, they generate an incredible amount of data. This information gives insight into where and when passengers travel, how they travel through the airport and what they buy. In turn this information can be analysed securely in order to tailor services and drive certain sales.

Different data can be used in different ways. For example, self-service check-in and bag-drop lets the airport know when a passenger has arrived. The opportunity then arises to target that passenger with tailored information, suggesting entertainment or facilities that are likely to be of interest before their flight. 

State-of-the-art 3D and mobile wayfinding, and passengers’ multi-media communications, alongside full content management can give airports useful insight into passenger behaviour. It is possible to track how people move around the airport and spot trends in how they complete their airport journeys.    

This data can then be utilised to enhance the passenger’s experience by supplying relevant information or through targeted advertisements. The lucrative potential for the latter is vast. The airport, airlines and retailers can be supplied with the information they need to offer the passenger exactly what they want.   

Another use of the acquired data could be to offer priority services to premium passengers or regular flyers. Airports could also use the information to give transit passengers important flight details, help reduce delays and simply better manage the ever-growing numbers of people that they must process on a daily basis.  

Embracing the aviation information age

Industry professionals and passengers alike are already benefiting from the incorporation of advanced technology and there is more to come. In order to remain competitive and deliver services that passengers want, it is essential that airports and airlines adopt new technology. 

Today, a passenger can use self-service check-in and bag-drop facilities without fuss or wasting time. They can seamlessly travel through the airport’s security and on to boarding with minimum hassle. The system is efficient, making for happy passengers. 

Simultaneously, airports and airlines are able to run more efficiently while collecting data to not only improve the passenger experience, but encourage customer loyalty and drive effective marketing schemes. 

So what is next? The use of new technology in the industry is increasing and there is no reason to think that this trend will end any time soon. As advancements such as the Cloud and Internet of Things are unveiled, it is exciting to consider what the future could offer. 

One thing is for certain: airports and airlines will have to continue to embrace this new technology in order to remain competitive and deliver the services that modern passengers demand.   

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Biometrics for Airports: 1-to-1 and 1-to-Many - which is going to be the better of the two options and why?

“The industry as a whole is waking up to the fact that Biometrics can both improve security and improve the passenger experience”

Biometrics for Airports:  1-to-1 and 1-to-Many - which is going to be the better of the two options and why?  

Tony - I would say this has become a hot topic for debate in the last 12 months or so because of the various changes and improvements that have occurred with the Biometric technology itself. The processing power required for 1-to-Many validation has increased tremendously and also the associated hardware has become ever more sophisticated and this has made 1-to-Many much more practical in terms of speed of response and accuracy than it was previously.

So for the passenger, this will be the way of the future simply because it is fast and accurate and easier because they don’t have to produce any other documentation to be validated.

When they go through security or the self-boarding gate for example, then their Biometric token (e.g. their face, iris etc) simply becomes the boarding pass so they don’t have to produce another piece of paper as well.

1-to-Many validation works by capturing an image of your face and comparing it to a larger set of images and so it “sees” you in that larger set but at what point in the process does the system record your face and do you have to go in at a different time and take a picture?

Tony - At the moment it’s based on registering at your first contact point in the airport so whether that be a check in desk, self-service kiosk or a self-service bag drop you’d be registered at that point and right there at that point it would associate your face or your Biometric token with your passport and boarding pass. There after you only need to show your face to produce the other two because the system recognizes and associates them all.

Ok so when that first initial registration happens do you only need license/passport or whatever? To confirm that it is you then you can put it away for the rest of the experience? Is that the process?

Tony - Exactly that yes so it proves that it is you and that the facial images are matched with the image on the passport which confirms it’s you, captures the rest of the passport details that are on the machine readable zone and then matches that and or stores that in conjunction to your Biometric and your boarding pass.

In terms of the technology over the past 12 months getting faster and more accurate is there a piece of that technology that has significantly improved to make everything better?

Tony - I think that it’s probably three separate components: the accuracy of the cameras themselves, the processing power of the work station equipment that processes those images plus the methodology and algorithms that are used to determine if the face has been matched. For example we are working with our suppliers and their infrared cameras and they are now using artificial intelligence to train the matching technology to recognise faces which improves speed and reliability. Using infrared means that the lighting conditions don’t affect the quality of the pictures so it’s consistent through every step of the process, irrespective of the ambient lighting around it. And those infrared cameras now have a much higher flash rate so they can take many more frames per second therefore have the chance to get a much better quality image of the face.

You said there is artificial intelligence - does that mean there is some learning that is going on so it gets better each time or how does that work?

Tony - Yes exactly that. Certainly in the UK a lot of this infrared camera technology was actually first used at building sites for access control to the site. In these circumstances finger prints were not any good because builders got very dirty or maybe even had no finger print at all because they had worn off during their work and this validates them for entry qualifications so they can they drive the high crane and things like that. As a result they have a vast library of faces that they can match and they train their engines against. As this is a known data base of faces when they do find somebody that doesn’t match they retrain the engine to acknowledge that this a valid face - it’s almost self-learning.      

So what are the safety concerns that this would bring on and what are you doing to overcome this?

Tony - Well the safety concern is if you like letting somebody through who you shouldn’t let through, so that’s the overriding concern at airside control and security gates. So the system is tuned to have zero false acceptances but knowing you will probably get a false rejection. We believe it’s better to reject somebody that you should otherwise let through rather than let somebody through that shouldn’t be let through. There will always be a need for a manual process anyway for people that cannot for whatever reason give a Biometric such as children, infants, maybe somebody is disabled and can’t look at the camera correctly so there will always be a manual process required anyway. Our preference is to reject somebody who should be accepted rather than the reverse.     

Would there ever be an issue if someone comes in and registers and then they come in on a new trip after having some sort of plastic surgery? Will people be able to change their faces?

Tony - at the moment and in the way we are using it’s not a technology issue. It is about data privacy and data retention and whether you can store a Biometric token and use it for future trips. So some airlines are asking for this for example so they can enroll their frequent flyers. It needs a common standard across the industry to make that feasible and worthwhile.

Is this an unresolved issue that we have to be aware of?

Tony - The industry is asking as a whole “can we share that Biometric”. Can we share for future use, can we share it for the inbound process to the destination airport, can we use it for someone arriving at the airport, can we use it at the departure process?  The ability to collect and retain the data is a separate activity to sharing it which is industry issue that has to be resolved and its not technology companies that can resolve that, you will need the cooperation of governments and airlines and airports to resolve that collectively.

Does Rockwell Collins have an opinion on whether it should be allowed to be shared? Or should it just be kept one use per trip?

Tony - Were very much of the view that should be shared as that’s when we all get the most benefit but it’s up to the various stakeholders and I suspect those stakeholders around the world will vary on their views of that.

So in a nutshell this streamlines the process of check in and although it’s not a perfect solution, if there was an instance where somebody was rejected then it would just default to the outdated process of manual check in?

Tony - Yes and the more you’re matching faces against the entire library the chances go up that you reject someone that should have been accepted. However at the boarding gate for example you can already reduce that chance from matching one to the population of the entire airport to one to matching the maximum number of passengers in the data base who are on that particular flight. In particular with self- boarding you know they are going to have to be on that particular flight number therefore there is no point matching against the entire data base, can restrict it to the 500/600 people you’ve got as a maximum configuration for an airbus 380 etc.

Why do we use face instead of eyes and/or fingerprints?

Tony - Because on the e-passport, every e-passport has to have a facial image in the chip.

What about using other biometrics with 1-to-Many?

Tony - Sure, for example in the Middle East where facial images are not appropriate for everybody such as females with burkas or head scarfs it might be better to have an iris recognition rather than facial recognition or iris and fingerprint token. However the reason we started with the face is that it is the only guaranteed token that’s on a passport. I know some countries use finger prints as well facial image but not every country does.

Can you see Biometrics being used in any other way in the airport?

Tony - Yes, one idea is for staff access control airside, we all have staff ID’s to pass through the airport that could biometrically be enabled with exactly the same technology. 

How much better does this actually make things? Is it a lot of work for the airlines and airports?

Tony - The industry as a whole is waking up to the fact that Biometrics can both improve security and improve the passenger experience. The work that we have done means that we can actually integrate any airline with any airport without changing any code on host systems or work station applications. So to the airline its totally transparent to them and we can implement it - I won’t say without them knowing  - but with minimal interruption as we don’t have to make any code changes to their systems or to their common use or muse station.

So cost wise this will relatively be cost effective to implant because you’re simply doing integration verses introducing totally new systems?

Tony – Yes. We will simply need to change one of our existing pieces of software and add the new pieces of software that enable the capture plus of course the hardware to do the biometric capture.

Any last thoughts?

Tony - The world is moving towards self- service “everything” and to actually facilitate the true self-service bag drop without agent involvement you do need something - to validate or to show that you’re the person you say you are - that matches your passport.

I think the implementation of the one to many is an exciting solution as far as the passengers are concerned because they don’t have to keep producing boarding passes or passports as they process through their airport journey. For example in the UK  (and I know it’s true of other airports internationally) you have to produce your boarding pass at the departure gate so the agent  can physically match your picture  to the passport to prove that it’s you.  If we can eliminate that and achieve greater security as a result it’s both easier for the passenger and easier for the airline.

Click here for Rockwell Collins' White Paper: Assessment of 1-to-Many matching in the airport departure process

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Welcome to Talking Airports: Connectivity

Welcome to the Connectivity section of Rockwell Collins Talking Airports.

Here you will find articles and links to more information from Rockwell Collins related to any aspect of connectivity, however some articles may appear under more than one category depending on the content.

This section will cover topics on;

  • Airport Connectivity
  • Airfield Connectivity

You can be automatically notified of any new articles by subscribing to this section at any time using the link in the tool bar near the top of the page or by clicking the category in the menu on the right and choosing the relevant subscribe option at the top of the page.

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Welcome to Talking Airports: Baggage Systems

Welcome to the Baggage Systems section of Rockwell Collins Talking Airports.

Here you will find articles and links to more information from Rockwell Collins related to any aspect of baggage systems, however some articles may appear under more than one category depending on the content.

This section will cover topics on;

  • Baggage Management Systems (BMS)
  • Baggage Messaging Systems

You can be automatically notified of any new articles by subscribing to this section at any time using the link in the tool bar near the top of the page or by clicking the category in the menu on the right and choosing the relevant subscribe option at the top of the page.

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Welcome to Talking Airports: Airport Operations

Welcome to the Airport Operations section of Rockwell Collins Talking Airports.

Here you will find articles and links to more information from Rockwell Collins related to any aspect of airport operations, however some articles may appear under more than one category depending on the content.

This section will cover topics on;

  • Flight Information Displays (FIDS)
  • Airport Databases
  • Resource Management
  • Security
  • Payment Solutions
  • Billing
  • Artificial Voice Systems

You can be automatically notified of any new articles by subscribing to this section at any time using the link in the tool bar near the top of the page or by clicking the category in the menu on the right and choosing the relevant subscribe option at the top of the page.

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Welcome to Talking Airports: Passenger Facilitation

Welcome to the Passenger Facilitation section of Rockwell Collins Talking Airports.

Here you will find articles and links to more information from Rockwell Collins related to any aspect of passenger facilitation, however some articles may appear under more than one category depending on the content.

This section will cover topics on;

  • Common Use Identity Management
  • Automated Passport Control
  • Automated Border Control

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Welcome to Talking Airports: Systems Integration

Welcome to the Systems Integration section of Rockwell Collins Talking Airports.

Here you will find articles and links to more information from Rockwell Collins related to any aspect of systems integration, however some articles may appear under more than one category depending on the content.

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Welcome to Talking Airports: Passenger Processing

Welcome to the Passenger Processing section of Rockwell Collins Talking Airports.

Here you will find articles and links to more information from Rockwell Collins related to any aspect of passenger processing, however some articles may appear under more than one category depending on the content.

This section will cover topics on;

  • Common Use Check In
  • Self Service Kiosks
  • Off Site Check In
  • Self Service Bag Drop

You can be automatically notified of any new articles by subscribing to this section at any time using the link in the tool bar near the top of the page or by clicking the category in the menu on the right and choosing the relevant subscribe option at the top of the page.

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